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Clore Stories
Jay

Classic Car or Road Trip Rescuer – JNC660 Does it All

“I bought a JNC660 because my ‘54 Chevy Bel Air would not crank over when it was hot. It has a 350 engine with about 400 HP. I used it a couple of times. I replaced the ground cables with 1/0 cables. Now it starts well.  Then, we were loaded up to go on a 900 mile trip and the van would not start. We jump started it with the JNC660 and drove all day. The next morning, the van wouldn’t start again, so we jump started it again. We drove to our destination. Then we got a new battery.  I also jumped a guy’s truck on the way. I am really glad I bought it. Thank You.” Grady Roanoke, TX

Products
Jay

JNC345 Gets Next Gen Update

The JNC345 is an ideal shop tool, combining extreme jump starting power with numerous features that deliver utility, convenience and safety, including UL2743 safety certification, USB outlets to power small electronics, 12 Volt power supply capability and a high intensity LED work light.

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Jay

Put Away Season is Here – How to Win the Storage Game

Here in the Northern America, we’ve reached the time of year when vehicles and equipment of all sizes get put away, as we deal with things like frozen lakes and salty roads. Here in KC, next week is going to bring our first wave of freezing temps and nasty weather. So, whether you have a hot rod, ATV, motorcycle, riding mower, pontoon boat or Waverunner, odds are it was recently or will very soon be put away until next spring. That’s great when it comes to getting your equipment out of the elements and preserving its cosmetic appearance, but, what about the battery(ies) contained in it? Batteries are expensive these days. Even if you’re still primarily using traditional flooded lead acid batteries, they are steep. Heaven help you if your batteries are of the AGM or lithium variety, as these battery types can range to 2-4 times the cost of a traditional flooded lead acid battery. So, it makes a lot of sense, regardless of which type you have, to do what you can to get the longest life from them. In addition to the fact that letting your battery(ies) reach a deeply discharged state is detrimental to their long

A Kia saga worth reading about
Resources
Jay

A Kia Saga Worth the Read

OK, this is a Kia saga worth reading. We’re going to give it to you straight – this one’s a bit long. In it, Robert from New York tells the tale of a troublesome KIA that had bounced around to several shops without final resolution before it got to him, an angry vehicle owner, a bunch of previously installed parts thrown at the problem and a very tricky diagnostic challenge. Of course, he starts by asking, “Where do I start?” He then executes a very logical and deliberate strategy to narrow his way to the potential root cause of the problem, verifying each step and confirming his conclusions through rigorous testing. It is textbook diagnostic work. As one commenter noted, “I don’t read extremely long post often. However, I seem to get sucked in real quick on your write ups. Great process and very informative. Thanks for sharing it.” We couldn’t agree more. Read the full article To see the original post at https://diag.net, click on the above screen shot or click here. To access complete forum posts or participate in the discussion requires a membership to the site. There are several membership options available, about which you can learn

Clore Stories
Jay

Record JNC Longevity?

Ed. Note: We hear from many users who get extreme longevity from their Booster PAC and Jump-N-Carry units. It is not unheard of (though it certainly is not the norm) for users to report getting 8-12 years of service from their units. This story is the longest unit longevity we’ve heard reported from the field, which is why, despite it being very short, we are spotlighting it. “Wanted to jump start my ‘56 Chevy and my 2003 JNC660 would not charge to the green area of DC Volts! 20 years of usage was awesome, so now, purchasing a new JNC660 with some upgraded features is a plus. Want to thank the company for making an excellent product!!!!” JackAnnville , PA

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Jay

Electrical System Diagnosis – From Wide Focus to Detailed Dive

The world of electrical system diagnosis is both wide and deep. Today’s successful technician needs to have both a breadth of knowledge across many makes and models as well as specific knowledge about component function, the way different system components interact and the way these systems command and control their operation. It’s not an easy task keeping up with it all. Judging from the sheer quantity of trade publication articles and the number of related courses at events such as the KC Vision Show, this is an area of vehicle service that is complex, wide ranging and virtually bottomless. With the hope that we can deliver some useful resources to your digital doorstep, we’re going to delve into some recent articles on the topic in this month’s article. Primer on 12V Electrical System Diagnostics This article by Jeff Cox, on VehicleServicePros.com, is a great starting point as we dig into vehicle electrical system diagnosis, starting us out with a wide angle overview of this area of vehicle repair before we dive into specific areas of focus within the system. His article hits on many points that will be familiar with our regular readers, particularly the interconnectedness of the different components

Products
Jay

Green Light is On, Why am I Charging?

We briefly touched on this topic in last month’s feature article, but the number of calls, emails, blog posts and Clore stories submitted related to it definitely warrant addressing it on a stand-alone basis. Many customers are confused when we call for charging their unit when they see a green light (or FULL) when they check the battery’s charge status or State of Charge (SoC). So, let’s dig into that. Here’s how we usually get this question/comment:   • “Your carton said to charge the unit for 24 hours when first opened, but the unit shows a green light?”   • “I got your recharge alert, but my unit shows fully charged.”   • “I love my JNC660/ES5000. I’ve had it three years and it has never even needed a charge.” There are many other variations, but the three above examples essentially capture the general idea. It’s true that our units typically hold a charge for a long time. That’s a really good thing. But, it shouldn’t stop you from regularly charging the unit, which is the most beneficial thing that you can do for your jump starter’s health. So, we’ll tackle each of these scenarios individually below. Out of

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Jay

Complicated Crank – No Start

It has been awhile since we featured a case study from Bob in Massachusetts. They’re always well organized, interesting and helpful, and this one is no exception. Here, he recounts a 2008 Jeep Wrangler with a “Click/No-Crank” complaint when the vehicle was hot. As he notes, his first reaction was, “…it sounded like the classic click/no-crank of a bad starter.” But, based on everything involved in executing a successful crank on this vehicle, he decided to dig a little deeper. Of course, since this turned into a case study, things turned out to be a little more complicated. In fact, throwing a new starter at this one wouldn’t have solved the problem at all. Read the full story to find out what the root cause was and, more importantly, the diagnostic path Bob used to get him to a successful and lasting repair. Read More To see the original post at https://diag.net, click on the above screen shot or click here. To access complete forum posts or participate in the discussion requires a membership to the site. There are several membership options available, about which you can learn more here. About Diagnostic NetworkDiagnostic Network is an online community of industry professionals

Clore Stories
Jay

JNC – A Real Bacon Saver

“As we planned our big move from the West Coast to the East Coast, by way of a 30 day camping road trip, I picked up a Jump-N-Carry JNC300XL, just as a precaution. Our car was 10 years old, the battery of unknown provenance, and we planned to use the 12V accessory plug to power a low-voltage refrigerator for most of the journey. As the journey progressed, I quickly noticed that our old battery was not up to the task of keeping the refrigerator running for long periods of time. With a combination of periodic running and ice blocks I was able to maintain operation until one fateful night. We were camping in a remote campsite near Glacier National Park. There was a cold snap overnight and that was enough to have the battery crank its last crank. In the morning, it was dead. The JNC jumped the car without issue. We had reservations for the Going-to-the-Sun Road, one of our most anticipated experiences of the trip, so rather than deal with the battery immediately, I put my faith in the JNC and headed into the park. That little pack jumped our car another 5 times through the day before

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Jay

Your Questions Answered, 2023 Edition

It has been quite some time since we did an article focused on the most common questions we receive via phone, email and blog comments, so we thought it was time to take a swing through the mailbag in the hopes that it just might address a concern that you could have. Here we go! Q1:  How often do I need to charge my jump starter? We strongly advise charging your jump starter, whether lead acid or lithium, every 90 days. This is the number one determinant of jump starter longevity, due to the fact that batteries (all batteries) really like to be charged and really don’t like to sit for any length of time in a discharged state. We even provide a free quarterly reminder email to charge your jump starter ­– you can sign up here – that’s how much we want you to charge it on a regular basis. During periods of extreme cold, we recommend charging more frequently, such as monthly. Charge early and charge often – make sure your jump starter is ready to answer the call when you need it the most. Q2a:  What if I go to recharge my unit after 90 days